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Boundary fence grants

boundary fence grants april tf 2020

Funding is available to help bushfire-hit farmers rebuild boundary fencing bordering public lands in New South Wales.

Bushfire-affected landholders will now have access to their share of up to $209 million to help cover the cost of rebuilding boundary fences, after Deputy NSW Premier John Barilaro launched the NSW Government’s ‘Supporting our Neighbours’ project.

Mr Barilaro said the project would not only help farmers recover, but would provide a much-needed shot in the arm for regional economies at a critical time.

“Under this package, we will provide up to $5,000 per kilometre for the purchase of materials to rebuild existing fences adjoining public lands damaged by the summer fires.

“This will go a long way to helping farmers cover the cost,” Mr Barilaro said.

“This is a great opportunity for all landholders to engage the services of their local contractors at a time when supporting local businesses has never been more vital.

“This is about helping bushfire-affected communities get back on their feet and so we are doing everything we can to make sure that happens.”

NSW Minister for Agriculture Adam Marshall said the funding would be delivered through a one-off grant, which would also be issued retrospectively to help cover the costs already incurred by landholders.

“We know this has been a major issue for fire-affected farmers,” Mr Marshall said.

“We will have dedicated boundary fence coordinators working with farmers to identify their needs and negotiate with the public land managers to ensure money gets into farmers’ pockets as soon as possible.

“We’re encouraging landholders to use this opportunity to upgrade their fencing bordering public lands and use fire resilient materials wherever possible.

“Landholders who have already started rebuilding can still receive a backdated payment.”

For more information about the program is available from Local Land Services or by calling 1300 778 080.

Find out more.

This article was first published in The Fence magazine.

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